A student works on music using a midi controller.

Summer Music Studies 2022

Our courses are timely and relevant, and we strive to offer the highest quality professional development and graduate studies opportunities for music educators nationwide. You’ll uncover new ways of teaching and learning through music by using the latest tools, technology and instructional strategies.
— Jenny L. Neff, Ed.D, Summer Music Studies Program Director Music Education (MM)
Registration for Summer 2022 is currently open
 
If you are interested in a course that is full, please email sms@uarts.edu with the course information to be added to the waitlist.
 
Learn more about our 2022 course offerings below. 
 

SESSION 1
June 27–July 1

SESSION 2
July 11–July 15

SESSION 3
July 18–July 22

SESSION 4
July 25–July 29

Register for summer 2022 courses

Contact registrar@uarts.edu if you are experiencing issues with course registration.

Course Offerings

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Alternative

Introduction to Electric Bass (MMED/AMUS 603) 

June 27– July 1   |   3 credits

Instructor: Micah Jones

Location: UArts

This course is designed for the music educator who has little or no formal experience playing bass guitar. The teaching of this course is focused on developing individual techniques and processes to ultimately be shared with their own bass students in the classroom. The course will explore different right-hand techniques, finger picking with one or two fingers, and slap bass. With the left hand, the student will discover efficient scale and arpeggio fingerings, covering one and two octaves. All of these techniques are designed to give each student a solid foundation in the fundamentals of bass playing, while learning the role of the bass at the same time. Stylistically, the course will explore different grooves from rock, blues, bossa nova, to walking jazz bass. Beyond the fundamentals of groove, each student will attempt to improvise on the fundamentals of harmony. Students should bring their own electric bass. Amps will be provided. (If you have difficulty finding an electric bass, please email sms@uarts.edu)

In-Person
Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.


Play Guitar, Teach Guitar + Ukulele (MMED/AMUS 623) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Kevin Hanson

Location: UArts

Play Guitar, Teach Guitar + Ukulele is designed to illuminate various approaches and techniques of playing and teaching guitar. Concepts learned will include, but not be limited to: Fretboard Basics, playing single-note melodies, basic chord shapes in the open position and in “Barre” form, picking techniques, strumming techniques, and how to strum rhythms in different styles and grooves. Students will learn basic songs with simple chord progressions, including: folk songs, Blues, three-chord rock. From the teaching lens, students will learn how to teach guitar to visual, cerebral, and conceptual learners. Songs studied will include idioms of rock n roll, RnB, folk, Blues, American standards, Reggae, and Latin-flavored guitar. Students will need to have their own guitar and ukulele. Please bring: A guitar to the course each day that is in quality working order to best facilitate learning. Students should also bring a pick, guitar strap, fresh pack of guitar strings, audio and video for your computer; Optional: capo. The course fee includes a ukulele that students will receive in class. 

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.


Alternative Ensembles in the Music Education Classroom (MMED/AMUS 666) 

June 27– July 1   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Bryan Powell

Location: UArts

This course will explore diverse idioms of collaboration and performance through ensembles typically seen as “alternative” to the traditional opportunities students have received in the music education classroom. This course is geared towards the music educator looking to explore and understand the diverse means by which students can be creative and collaborative through music in school. Students will develop lesson plan ideas, rehearsal and performance skills, and the ability to lead and teach innovative ensembles. Students will learn how to construct, plan for, and arrange for diverse alternative ensembles as well as learn how to research and obtain grant monies, and program resources. Students will understand how a highly creative approach to gaining resources can create an amazing experience for students. Age appropriate rehearsal and performance techniques, and classroom planning and resourcefulness are emphasized, along with how to obtain and select equipment, and how to compose and arrange music for ensemble success. Types of ensembles may include bucket drumming, rock band, ukulele, singer/songwriter solo and duo groups, and studio ensembles for rhythm section and horns. Participants will also learn how to use technology as part of the alternative ensemble experience. Scheduling note: A Thursday evening concert performance is a requirement of the course. As a result, the Friday class meeting will be for the AM session only.

In-Person

Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Thursday, Evening Concert

Friday 8:30–11:30 a.m.

 

Live Sound Production for Music Educators (MMED/AMUS 777) 

June 27– July 1   |   3 credits

Instructor: John Paul Beattie

Location: UArts

This course will explore the technology and techniques necessary to produce concerts and live events from the perspective of the music educator. The knowledge students will gain can be applied to the primary venue/auditorium at their school. Students will gain an understanding of the intricacies of audio in regard to live sound production. This includes learning about signal flow, signal processing, live mixing, microphones and live recording. This course will introduce an over-arching set of techniques and principles that students can transfer and utilize in their home schools and with their performance ensembles.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Drums

Introduction to Playing the Drum Set (MMED / DRUM 770) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Marc Dicciani

Location: Villanova

This course is designed for those who have little or no experience or formal training in drum set performance or practice. Teaching is directed towards enabling participants to acquire a facility for themselves, and in turn, to help them teach and coach their student drummers in developing better drumming skills and overall musicianship. You’ll learn about technique, styles (including rock, jazz, Brazilian, and Afro-Cuban), improvisation, reading, repertoire, and drum equipment. No equipment is required; you will be supplied with a pair of sticks, a method book, and a play-along CD. Each student will sit at their own professional drum set that includes all cymbals and hardware.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Playing the Drums: Level 2, Intermediate (MMED / DRUM  773) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Marc Dicciani

Location: Villanova

The course is designed for those who have attained some basic to moderate level of proficiency on the drumset, either as a result of having taken the first level of this course, or having played the drums previously. The teaching is directed towards primarily enabling students to acquire a more advanced level of ability for themselves, and also to improve the skills and knowledge required for group and private instruction and direction of students. Students study intermediate level of technique, styles, improvisation, reading, repertoire, and equipment, including electronic drums. No equipment is required; students will be supplied with a pair of sticks, a method book, and a play-along CD. Each student will sit at their own professional drum set that includes all cymbals and hardware

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Foundation Courses
Sociological Foundations of Music Education (MMED 602) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Deb Wolf

Location: Villanova

An intensive reading, research, and discussion course in the sociology of music education’s role in society. Students develop a basic understanding of the sociological function of music in society and how education in music should, but often does not, meet the greater society’s needs. Socialization in performing groups, group identity, and sociology of schools is studied. Current trends in US music education will be analyzed from a sociological perspective. Students will also develop basic sociological research and reporting skills. This course may be offered on-line.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Curriculum & Assessment in Music Education (MMED 603) 

July 18–22   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Cara Bernard

Location: Villanova

The course covers the development, writing, and evaluation of curriculum as a dynamic interactive process based on research. Students develop curriculum writing and evaluation skills through critical review of various curricula, analyses of curriculum models, and developing their own curricula. Measurement and assessment of learning, which is the crucial dynamic element in curricula, is covered in depth. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to critically analyze curricula, design curricula, and develop appropriate assessment tools for various music learning situations.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Historical and Philosophical Foundations in Music Education (MMED 605) 

July 11–15   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Danielle Cullen

Location: Villanova

This is an intensive course of study of the historical and philosophical foundations of music education. This course will encapsulate both the history of music education in the United States from the Colonial period to modern times, and a philosophical emphasis on twentieth and twenty-first century thought and movements in American music education. These movements and philosophies will be analyzed in terms of their impact and effectiveness and why some have succeeded where others failed. An analysis and synthesis of ideas and events will reveal historical cycles, socio-political ramifications, and periodic reintroduction/revision of previous approaches. Current trends in American music education will be analyzed from both historical and philosophical perspectives, while making evident to learners the connections of philosophical theories and theorists, and their significance through the history of music education.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.


Integration of Technology in Music Education, Section 1 (In-person) (MMED 606-01) 

June 27–July 1   |   3 credits

Instructor: Mike Fein

Location: UArts

This course provides intensive study for learning computer programs that support the music education classroom and for understanding the effective means to authentically integrate technology in K-12 music education. This course will be based upon the seven areas of music technology developed by the Technology Institute for Music Educators (TI:ME), the National Education Technology Standards developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), and supported by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME). The purpose of this course is to provide tools and resources to students that will enable them to become active agents in the growth of their technological skills that are needed to support learning in 21st-century classrooms.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Integration of Technology in Music Education, Section 2 (Online) (MMED 606-02) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Mike Fein

Location: Online

This course provides intensive study for learning computer programs that support the music education classroom and for understanding the effective means to authentically integrate technology in K-12 music education. This course will be based upon the seven areas of music technology developed by the Technology Institute for Music Educators (TI:ME), the National Education Technology 

Standards developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), and supported by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME). The purpose of this course is to provide tools and resources to students that will enable them to become active agents in the growth of their technological skills that are needed to support learning in 21st-century classrooms.

Asynchronous

 

Thesis/Project Development: Music Education (MMED 790) 

June 27–July 1   |  3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Jenny Neff

Location: UArts

The Music Education Thesis is the culmination of learning and professional growth established as an outcome of MM studies in Music Education and demonstrates mastery of the course of study through a well-designed and developed thesis. This final product is to be designed and focused to achieve outcomes that are based upon the synthesis of understandings acquired from courses in the content coursework, and through knowledge gained from the Foundational courses. The student’s synthesis of knowledge and skills will be exemplified through the creation of an original, creative, and thoughtful presentation. This course will include a pre-reading assignment. Please have 1-2 topics of interest for your area of research. You do not need to know EXACTLY what you are doing as your research project, but having narrowed it down to 1 or 2 areas will be helpful.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

 

Thesis Music Education (MMED 791) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Jenny L. Neff

Location: Online

The Music Education Thesis is the culmination of learning and professional growth established as an outcome of MM studies in Music Education, and demonstrates mastery of the course of study through a well-designed and developed thesis. This final product is to be designed and focused to achieve outcomes that are based upon the synthesis of understandings acquired from courses in the content coursework, and through knowledge gained from the Foundational courses. The student’s synthesis of knowledge and skills will be exemplified through the creation of an original, creative, and thoughtful presentation.

Required Synchronous Course Meetings
TBD

 

Project Music Education (MMED 795) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Jenny L. Neff

Location: Online

The Music Education Project is the culmination of learning and professional growth established as an outcome of MM studies in Music Education, and demonstrates mastery of the course of study through a well-designed and developed thesis. This final product is to be designed and focused to achieve outcomes that are based upon the synthesis of understandings acquired from courses in the content coursework, and through knowledge gained from the Foundational courses. The student’s synthesis of knowledge and skills will be exemplified through the creation of an original, creative, and thoughtful presentation

Required Synchronous Course Meetings
TBD

General Music: All Areas

Evolution of Song Styles: From Bessie Smith to Beyonce (STME 602 / AMUS 602) 

July 11–15 & July 18–22  |   3 credits

Instructor: Kevin Hanson

Location: Online

This class explores how three types of songs evolved in America throughout the decades, from the turn of the 20th century through modern times. From Bessie Smith to Beyonce, from Patsy Cline to Prince. These categories are: Torch and Flame Songs, Protest Songs, Novelty Songs. Songs within these three realms are explored using sound recordings, videos, and historical and biographical accounts of their inception and performance. 

Our investigations lead us to ask the following questions: What cultural, technological, and political changes in this country affected both how songs were written and recorded? How did these changes prepare audiences in successive eras to receive them? Did songs from one era change not only in production style and recording, but in lyrical content as new information and vocabulary were introduced to the world? How will songwriting styles and recording technology continue to evolve? Can we predict how styles and tastes will change by looking at the past? 

The goal of this class is to provide students with an understanding of how song styles have changed due to the evolution of technology, culture, and politics. This will provide students with ways to better express an informed viewpoint of music in America, and its ever-changing state, to colleagues, students, and friends.

Required Synchronous Course Meetings

Monday—Friday, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

 

Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs (AMUS 604 / STME 604) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Alice Hammel

Location: Online

The music classroom is an inherently inclusive and cooperative environment. Meeting the needs of students with special needs, however, requires a specific set of skills, dispositions, and experiences to appropriately adapt and modify instruction. Enhancing the inclusive and cooperative possibilities in the music classroom while meeting the needs of all students is a challenging, yet exhilarating possibility. This 

course will focus on identifying areas of strength and challenge in students with special needs, advocating for the appropriate classroom environment for all students, and the creation of adaptations and accommodations for students in inclusive and self-contained music classrooms. 

Asynchronous

 

Making Key Changes: Refresh Your Music Program (AMUS 605 / STME 605) 

July 18–22   |  3 credits

Instructor: Lori Schwartz Reichl

Location: Villanova

Are you in search of motivational methods for your music program?  Do you need to recharge your teaching techniques?  Discover a successful plan to organize efficiently, instruct skillfully, manage behavior effectively, and communicate clearly.  Course assignments are developed with the intention of immediate implementation to your music program.  Topics will include refreshing various parts of your program, such as a vision statement, motto, handbook/syllabus, classroom management, rehearsal routines, discipline plan, administrative support, recruitment/retention, performance opportunities, assessment, concert programming, organizational procedures, professional development, and other topics relevant to participant needs.  Sharpen your vision.  Make key changes to refresh your music program!

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

The Mindful Music Educator (AMUS 606 / STME 606) 

July 11–15   |   3 credits

Instructor: Josh Gansky

Location: Villanova

The Mindful Music Educator is a course for any music educator. It has 2 components: Mindfulness and Yoga for Musicians. Through the practice of Mindfulness, participants will be given time to pause and focus on their own care and well-being. This class is designed for the self-care of music educators. This is an opportunity for music educators to reduce stress, recharge, reflect, and reconnect. This time together will be both educational and experiential. This will be a shared experience of discovery, awareness, and care. Self-care is at the heart of everything we do: the way we feel, think, and act. When we take care of ourselves, we can be at our best, have more balance in our lives, and be more present for the people in our lives. This enhanced presence allows us to better connect with our families, friends, colleagues, and students. In addition, as teachers, we want our students to lead healthy lives, to learn healthy coping skills, and to make healthy choices. When we care for ourselves, we can be more present for our students and we can model healthy behaviors for them. Self-care allows us to better connect with ourselves and with the individuals who may cross our paths each moment of the day. We can actively enhance our lives and the lives of others.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Special Topic - Conversational Solfege (STME 626 / AMUS 667) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Melissa Strong

Location: Villanova

Conversational Solfege is a literature-driven approach to developing, enjoying, and connecting to music at a deeper level. In this course, participants will learn the philosophy behind Conversational Solfege and how to incorporate this approach into their teaching. Conversational Solfege is just one part of every general music lesson. It allows for flexibility to incorporate other activities and philosophies into each lesson on the journey to become joyful, competent, independent musical thinkers. Focus areas include learning how students become musical as they develop a strong sense of inner hearing. Participants will apply a sequence of tonal and rhythmic patterns, create sequential lessons to meet short- and long-range musical goals and deliver instruction that is developmentally-appropriate and engaging for students in the classroom. Participants completing all course requirements will receive certification in Conversational Solfege Levels 1 & 2 from the Feierabend Association for Music Education (FAME).

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Introduction to Dalcroze (MMED 638 / AMUS 638) 

June 27–July 1   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dawn Pratson & Michael Joviela

Location: UArts

This course is an introduction to the philosophy, principles, and practice of Dalcroze education. Dalcroze is a process for teaching musicianship to students of any age or level of experience using three main approaches: eurhythmics (purposeful, creative rhythmic movement), solfège, and improvisation. Participants will learn and practice a selection of Dalcroze strategies and techniques and apply them to specific instructional settings.    

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Creative Classroom Musicianship for Elementary General Music Education (MMED 751 / AMUS 751) 

July 18–22   |   3 credits

Instructor: Anne Sterner-Porreca

Location: Villanova

This course will focus on creative methods of teaching, planning, preparing and implementing effective general music classroom strategies and rehearsal methods in the elementary general music program. Students will be immersed in diverse learning methods and studies to activate new approaches to teaching musicianship and creativity. Students will learn innovative methods of vocal music rehearsal during classroom instruction, and how to evolve a high quality vocal music concert from classroom to stage. Students will also learn about methods to evolve a successful and thriving program supported by school administrators, community and parents. During this course, various general music publishers will also provide clinics about their elementary general music materials, and how these methods make connections to our music education standards and common core curriculum.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Instrumental Music: Concert Band

Composing and Arranging Seminar for School Bands (IEBD 607 / STME 607) 

July 18–22  |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Scott Watson

Location: Villanova

This course is designed to help those with an interest in writing music for school bands take their music to the next level of effectiveness and professionalism. There are many great reasons to compose and arrange for your own ensembles, and no one knows your band and its abilities better than you! For those exploring the idea of expanding the audience for their music, we’ll be discussing the conventions of writing at various levels (elementary, intermediate, high school and beyond), criteria related to the grading system (Grade .5 through 6 instrumentation, ranges, rhythms, doubling, etc.), preparing the score/parts, commissions, and tips for submitting music to publishers. Several scores which model effective band writing will be examined, along with a discussion of the craft of composition, traits of music of lasting worth, one-on-one coaching, and your questions.
Instructor Dr. Scott Watson, a frequently published and commissioned composer of music for band and orchestra at all levels and an exclusive composer for Alfred Music, will share publisher templates, tips for shopping your music to publishers, and ways to prepare professional looking scores and great sounding demo recordings. Bring your band sketches, manuscripts, and score files along. Bring your laptop and any other gear you may want (e.g. MIDI controller, etc.) for working on your scores throughout the week.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Integrating Social Emotional Learning Concepts Into Your Performance Ensemble (STME 614 / IEBD 614) 

July 18–22   |   3 credits

Instructor: David Knott

Location: Villanova

This course will provide music educators with an introduction to the basics of Trauma Informed Education and components of the Social Emotional Learning (SEL) framework. Participants will learn techniques to integrate into instruction for all levels and areas of music education. The focus will be on practical application and integration of concepts into the music education classroom. These classroom strategies will address challenges students face, adaptations to a socially and emotionally rich environment, benefits of SEL instruction, and creation of customized  lesson plans and activities for immediate use in the classroom. 

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Programming Diverse Styles of Music with Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices (STME 627 / IEBD 609) 

June 27–July 1   |   3 credits

Instructor: Samantha Andrejcisk

Location: UArts

This course will focus on the study and implementation of culturally diverse music for instrumental ensembles, including a variety of musical styles, cultures, composers, and genres. This course will cover the history of multicultural music education and how culturally diverse music has evolved for ensembles as well as explore culturally responsive teaching methods. Participants will explore online resources and create lesson plans for their ensembles using a variety of music styles and genres. Participants will reflect on their growth and knowledge about culturally responsive teaching and set goals for diversifying their programs. 

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Brass Instrument Technique Lab (MMED 678 / IEBD 678) 

July 11–15   |   3 credits

Instructor: Matt Gallagher & Guests

Location: Villanova

This course is designed for band directors to hone their technical and pedagogical skills on brass instruments. Students will learn elements of proper embouchure, breathing, and articulation as well as use, technical facility, and details 

specific to instruments in the brass family. This course will allow for students to deepen their skills and knowledge beyond their primary instruments to benefit their teaching and instruction in their classroom, lessons, and ensembles. Students will be involved in direct instruction on specific instruments daily, in rehearsal lab settings for jazz band and concert band, small brass ensemble playing, and whole group lecture. All students in the class, regardless of their primary instrument, will be playing instruments from the brass family. Participants should bring a trumpet to class. The following will be provided for the class: French horn, trombone, and tuba.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Rehearsal Strategies & Repertoire for Young Band (MMED 716/ IEBD 716) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. Scott Watson

Location: Villanova

This intensive course includes topics of interest and vital importance to music educators working with elementary and middle school concert band ensembles.  Topics covered include leading effective small group lessons and large ensemble rehearsals; evaluating, choosing, and using methods; concert planning and selecting repertoire; recruitment, retention, and switching instruments; assessment; and managing student records.  In-service teachers are encouraged to share their successful techniques as well. Participants should bring a primary and secondary instrument to use to try techniques presented and to play during ensemble repertoire reading sessions.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Instrumental Music: Strings

The Modern Orchestra Classroom: Meeting the Needs of All, One Student at a Time (MMED 652 / IESS 652) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Betsy Maliszewski

Location: Villanova

String educators are faced with external challenges that impact student musical growth such as course scheduling, state testing, and student conflicts. In addition, teachers need to address multiple capacities such as implementing new technology, working with diverse student populations, and using differentiation strategies to meet the needs of all learners. This course will address the challenges of serving the needs of all students while maintaining instructional integrity and curricular goals prescribed by district and state mandates. Each day a different topic will be covered in depth, as it relates to developing high quality string programs. Afternoon music reading sessions will be tied into the topic of the day, as will research based on practical and clinical application readings. Students will be expected to bring a string instrument and to participate in all aspects of playing daily throughout the course.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Instrument Repair

String Instrument Repair, Level 1 (MMED 661 / IREP 661) 

July 11–15   |   3 credits

Instructor: Christopher Bluemel

Location: Villanova

This course begins with an in-depth review of the construction and setup of all members of the violin family. Comprehensive hand-son sessions will help the participants gain confidence in various stringed instrument and bow repairs. Topics to be discussed include: bridge, peg, and sound post fitting, crack and seam hide glue repairs, loose fingerboards, salvaging old bows, etc. Participants will also become more effective in the classroom by learning tips to stretch repair budgets, the ability to make more informed instrument purchases, and how to determine repair vs. replacement. Tooling, parts and supplies are included. Please bring instruments to be used during the class, stretch that budget even more! All participants are requested to bring a minimum of 2 violins, 1 viola, and 1 cello, any size and in any condition. There is no limit on the number of instruments you may bring...the more the better.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

String Instrument Repair, Level 2 (MMED 668 / IREP 668) 

July 11–15   |   3 credits

Instructor: Christopher Bluemel

Location: Villanova

String Instrument Repair, Level 2 will provide a comprehensive review of the construction and setup of all members of the violin family. Students will learn advanced techniques to diagnose and address diverse stringed instrument and bow repairs, beyond the basics of those learned in String Repair Level 1. Advanced topics that deepen knowledge of more complex issues and assessment of repairs dealing with bridge, peg, and sound post fitting, crack and seam hide glue repairs, loose fingerboards, and salvaging old bows will be the focus of the course. Tooling, parts and supplies are included. Please bring instruments to be used during the class. All participants are requested to bring a minimum of 2 violins, 1 viola, and 1 cello, any size and in any condition. There is no limit on the number of instruments you may bring, in fact the more the better. This is a comprehensive, hands-on course that requires students to have previously taken String Repair, Level 1.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.


Band Instrument Repair, Level 1 - Section 1 (MMED 611-01 / IREP 611-01) 

July 18–22   |   3 credits

Instructor: Christopher Bluemel

Location: Villanova

 

Band Instrument Repair, Level 1 - Section 2 (MMED 611-02 / IREP 611-02) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Christopher Bluemel

Location: Villanova

Knowledge of instrument repair can stretch your budget dollars. Learn how to fix those little problems yourself. Replace springs, loosen stuck slides and even do some dent work. Preventive maintenance and emergency repairs can save time and money. What to bring: Bring a variety of school instruments for repair or use the instruments supplied. Upon successful registration for the course, each participant will receive an email containing detailed information on what instruments, tooling, and project materials are needed for the class. All tooling, parts, supplies and older instruments’ (for practice repairs) are provided. The course is structured so each participant has time to learn and practice the repair procedures and then they may perform the detailed repairs and maintenance procedures to their own and/or school owned instruments, while under the supervision of the instructor. Participants should bring instruments that are in need of repair from their districts.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Jazz

Beginning Jazz Improvisation (STME 622 / IEJZ) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Mike Fein

Location: Online

This course is designed for music performers and educators who want to learn how to improvise and teach improvisation in the classroom. Through carefully selected jazz repertoire, participants will learn the basic mechanics of improvisation and the essential music theory elements needed to improvise and teach improvisation including modal improvisation, the blues, ii-V-I progressions, and simplifying chord progressions. Participants will practice and perform jazz improvisation concepts on the instrument of their choice. No previous experience with improvisation is required.

Asynchronous

Music Technology

Teaching Music Improvisation with the iPad (MMED 682 / MTEC 682) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Michael Fein

Location: Online

This course is designed for elementary and secondary general music teachers and ensemble directors (vocal, strings, band, and jazz ensemble) who want to enhance improvisation skills in their students and who have access to an iPad for use in the classroom/rehearsal as well as teachers who are working in a 1:1 iPad classroom.   Participants will use GarageBand for iOS and iReal Pro to create custom improvisation materials and discover existing resources.  Participants will learn how to share these materials with students via YouTube, Dropbox, and/or Google Drive.  Participants will learn the basic mechanics of improvising and the essential music theory elements needed to teach improvisation including modal improvisation, the blues, and simplifying chord progressions.  No previous experience with improvisation is required. (Note: Students will need an iPad to participate in this course.)

Asynchronous

 

The Dynamic Music Creation Duo: Noteflight and Soundtrap (with Noteflight Learn Certification) (STME 612 / MTEC 602) 

June 13–August 5    |   3 credits

Instructor: Stefani Langol

Location: Online

Creativity – Composition – Collaboration! Using both notation and a digital audio workstation (DAW) opens up endless creative music-making possibilities. This course will take an in-depth view at combining traditional notation with the power of multi-track MIDI and audio recording for developing basic musical concepts through the creative process of music composition. Noteflight and Soundtrap, the leaders in online collaborative music software, seamlessly integrate for easy MIDI file export between programs, making it easy to migrate back and forth between both programs. Myriad projects will be explored, including designing collaborative composition activities. This course is designed for all grade levels, and you will receive free access to both Noteflight Learn and Soundtrap for the duration of the course. Upon completion, you will be eligible to receive Noteflight Learn Certification (to learn more about Noteflight Learn Certification, visit http://bit.ly/2Dh57Ud.

Asynchronous

 

Exploring and Creating Resources for Online Teaching and Learning (STME 623 / MTEC 603) 

June 14–August 6   |   3 credits

Instructor: Stefani Langol

Location: Online

There are countless online tools that enable teachers to create engaging materials that support all aspects of music teaching and learning, in both synchronous and asynchronous environments. This course is designed for music educators of all levels who are curious and motivated to explore and learn a variety of cloud-based tools that can be used to inspire creativity, encourage hands-on learning, and equip you and your students with digital skills. 

This project-based course will explore a wide spectrum of tools, provide grounding for how to use them, and explore ways the resulting resources can be used with students. Topics include: music creation and collaboration; creative and effective image editing and design; recording and editing screencast videos; streaming audio and video; easy website design; live streaming, web conferencing, and learning management systems effectively; and the use of myriad educational technology tools for creating and sharing projects, presentations and assessment. Free and low-cost cloud-based tools will be used in this course, with mention of software-installed solutions and useful hardware when relevant. This course can be completed using a desktop/laptop running any operating system, or a Chromebook.  

Asynchronous

 

Google Fundamentals for Music Educators (STME 624 / MTEC 604) 

June 13–July 1 (3 weeks)  |   3 credits

Instructor: Theresa Hoover

Location: Online

Google for Education offers numerous tools that music educators can use in their classrooms. These tools allow teachers and students to create and share digital content, communicate effectively, collaborate within and outside of the classroom, and increase productivity. In this course, teachers will learn the basics for using a variety of Google tools, focusing specifically on applications for the music classroom. Throughout the course, teachers will complete practical projects to strengthen their understanding of Google for Education, with the intent that each project can be used in their classrooms. This course is taught by a Google for Education Certified Trainer and Innovator. Successful completion of the course will prepare teachers for the Google for Education Level 1 Certification Exam, which will be taken at the conclusion of the three weeks. This course can be completed using a desktop/laptop running any operating system, or a Chromebook.  

Required Synchronous Course Meetings

Tuesdays, 7–8 pm

Thursdays, 7–8 pm (optional)

 

Advanced Google Tools for Music Educators (STME 625 / MTEC 605) 

July 11–29  (3 weeks) |   3 credits

Instructor: Theresa Hoover

Location: Online

Music teachers can take their Google for Education skills to the next level with this advanced course. Here, teachers will build upon their current knowledge of Google tools to increase technology integration in the music classroom. They will learn how to maximize efficiency within Google Classroom, create digital lesson experiences, and differentiate content for students. All projects completed throughout the course will offer teachers the flexibility to create something that can be used in their classrooms. 

This course is taught by a Google for Education Certified Trainer and Innovator. Successful completion of the course will prepare teachers for the Google for Education Level 2 Certification Exam, which will be taken at the conclusion of the three weeks. While completing the Level 1 Certification before taking this course is not required, prior experience using the Google for Education tools is necessary. This course can be completed using a desktop/laptop running any operating system, or a Chromebook. 

Required Synchronous Course Meetings

Tuesdays, 7–8 pm

Thursdays, 7–8 pm (optional)

Orff Schulwerk: Levels I, II, III + Supplemental

Orff Team:

Michelle Fella Przybylowski
Course Director, Level III

Ardith Collins, Level I

Cyndee Giebler, Level II

Griff Gall, All Levels

Janie Vance, Movement

Kristin Showalter, Recorder

Nick Wild, Theory

 

Orff Level I (MMED 738 / ORFF 738) 

July 11–15 + July 18-22   |   4 credits

Instructor: Ardith Collins

Location: Villanova

Pedagogy skills for teaching basic Orff Schulwerk will be explored and discussed through the use of Music for Children, Murray Volume I and pentatonic folk song material, movement and recorder. Level I teachers will actively learn to use speech, rhymes, poetry, playing pitched and unpitched percussion as well as singing, playing, and improvising in pentatonic for creating an active music curriculum in the school setting. Soprano Recorder pedagogy and skills, creating student-friendly compositions in an elemental style, and models for improvisation will be developed.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Orff Level II (MMED 739 / ORFF 739) 

July 11–15 + July 18-22   |   4 credits

Instructor: Cyndee Giebler

Location: Villanova

Level II will be a continuation and refinement of Level I content and will explore the aspects of complex rhythms and meter, movement accompaniment, transposed pentatonic, hexatonic, and other modal melodies including: Dorian, Phrygian, Aeolian, Ionian, Lydian and Mixolydian. Movement: form-based choreography and traditional folk dance will be used. The alto recorder will be used throughout and the wider ranges of the soprano recorder will be explored, with an emphasis on modal repertoire and improvisation. Music for Children Murray Volumes II & IV will be the foundation of the course. *Prerequisite: Orff Level 1.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Orff Level III (MMED 740 / ORFF 740) 

July 11–15 + July 18-22   |   4 credits

Instructor: Michelle Fella Przybylowski

Location: Villanova

Orff Level III will focus on pedagogy of more complex music from Music for Children Volumes III & V as well as eclectic folk music and more complex musical elements, including syncopation, meter, permutations of l6th notes, melody, theme and variation, chaconne, irregular speech/poetry and iconic notation, with an emphasis on improvisation and drama. Recorder studies will explore a wide range of music, including Schulwerk source materials, traditional folk music, and historical and modern repertoire. Movement classes will include a more detailed study of Laban’s movement efforts, folk dances in complex meter, and more complex choreography synthesizing all dance elements studied thus far. *Prerequisites: Orff Levels I & II.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

Planning and Reflection in the Orff Schulwerk Curriculum Development Process (STME 629 / ORFF 742) 

July 11–15   |   3 credits

Instructor: Diana Hawley

Location: Villanova

This Orff supplemental course helps general music teachers develop an Orff Schulwerk-inspired curriculum for use in their unique professional settings. Participants will explore how to bring the playfulness, creativity, and spontaneity of the Orff process into a structure suitable for the classroom. *Prerequisite: Orff Levels I and II from any AOSA approved course.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Vocal/Choral

Secondary Vocal Music Rehearsal and Repertoire Strategies (MMED 627 / VCE 627) 

July 25–29   |   3 credits

Instructor: Jason Bizich

Location: Villanova

This course will provide students with an in-depth analysis, study and ensemble approach to vocal ensemble rehearsal strategies and repertoire at the secondary level (middle school and high school vocal music ensembles). Students will gain an understanding of effective rehearsal strategies for vocal ensembles, implementation of methodology to support student musical growth, assessment, and the opportunity within the vocal music arena to apply design methods and instructional pedagogy to the ensemble setting. It is an expectation that students will be immersed in singing to effectively apply strategies and understandings developed throughout the course.

In-Person

Monday—Friday, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

 

The Choral Warm-Up: Philosophy and Pedagogy (STME 630  / VCE 602) 

June 13–August 5   |   3 credits

Instructor: Dr. James Jordan

Location: Online

This course provides an in-depth study of the choral warm-up. Participants explore and engage in a warm-up procedure that incorporates contemporary groundbreaking voice pedagogy, leading to a solid foundation of vocal technique for choirs of any age. Core content will include exercises and sequential warm-ups to build both vocal technique and aural skills in choir. Participants will explore the historical development of group vocal technique and its pedagogical role in the ensemble, including fundamentals of vocal technique and sequencing. Additionally, participants will better understand the role of an accompanist and how to collaborate in rehearsals.

Asychronous

On-campus housing is not available at UArts. 

Click here for a list of nearby hotels that offer discounts to UArts students

Click here for directions to campus and nearby parking options
 


Registration for Summer 2022 housing is now closed. 

Students must check in on Sundays between 2pm and 6pm:

July 10 (for courses starting 7/11)
July 17 (for courses starting 7/18)
July 24 (for courses starting 7/25)

Check in is not available after 6pm on Sundays.

Check out is on Fridays @ 11:30am.

Check in to your reserved room at
VU Conference Services Office
Galberry Hall 3rd Floor
Conference Service Desk: (610) 519‐5554

View Villanova Campus Map

 

Two bedroom, double occupancy units contain:
 
  • Kitchen - full kitchen contains a standard size refrigerator, a microwave, a stove with four burners, a self-cleaning oven, cabinets and drawers.
  • Living Room/Dining Area (18' 9" x 11' 10") - contains a kitchen table with four chairs, a sofa, a lounge chair, a coffee table, two counter stools, an entertainment unit and wiring for cable television. Windows are 56" x 60."
  • Bedrooms (16' 6" x 11' 7") - double occupancy bedroom units contain two of the following in each bedroom: beds, dressers, desks, desks chairs, closets and wiring for telephone/computer jacks and cable television. Closets are 41" wide x 23" deep and bed height from the floor is 32".
  • Bathrooms (7' 6" x 5' and 6' 8" x 3' 9") - two full bathrooms with showers and two sinks in vanity area

 

  • Three dinners are included with housing registration:
    Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays ONLY
    Dining Hall Dinner Meal Period:  4:15 PM ‐ 7:15 PM
     
  • No personal heating, air-conditioning or cooking apparatus shall be allowed in University facilities. Portable box fans are permitted. Occupants who are assigned to apartments may provide other small cooking appliances for personal use as long as they are UL approved, have self-contained heating units, and are approved by a University Office of Conference Services central office administrator.


Wildcards swipe cards will be issued at check-in for housing rooms. They are disposable and do not need to be returned at departure. There is a $10.00 replacement fee if a Wildcard is lost during your stay and a replacement card is issued.

Complimentary parking is available South and West Campus Apartment lots
 

For VU Campus Emergencies: dial Public Safety at (610) 519-4444

 

Housing Details

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Week #1: Classes start July 11 (check in Sunday July 10)

Deadline to submit housing registration for Week 1 is June 23, 2022

1-week housing (July 10-14) double occupancy per apartment + 3 pre-paid dinners (Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday)
Single week only - single week rates cannot be combined for multi-week stays.

$400 per person

 

2-week housing (July 10- 21) double occupancy per apartment + 6 pre-paid dinners (Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday)

$900 per person

 

3-week housing (July 10-28) double occupancy per apartment + 9 pre-paid dinners (Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday)  

$1,400 per person

Week #2: Classes start July 18 (check in on Sunday July 17)

Deadline to submit housing registration for Week 2 is July 1, 2022

1-week housing (July 17-21) double occupancy per apartment + 3 pre-paid dinners (Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday) 
Single week only - single week rates cannot be combined for multi-week stays. 

$400 per person

 

2-week housing (July 17-29) double occupancy per apartment + 6 pre-paid dinners (Tuesdays/Wednesdays/Thursdays)

$900 per person

Week #3: Classes start July 25 (check in on Sunday July 24)

Deadline to submit housing registration for Week 3 is July 7, 2022

1-week housing (July 25-29) double occupancy + 3 pre-paid dinners (Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday)  

$400 per person